So, my happiness doesn’t come from money or fame. My happiness comes from seeing life without struggle.
Nicki Minaj
This is our final segment on our series on fame, that illusive and orgasmic mirage that many of us endlessly pursue but yet, we often dislike it when we actually find it. You can read our first segment here and second segment here. In the end, what I found that is particularly compelling when reflecting on this topic is that there is very little research or commentary that actually supports the “at all cost” pursuit of fame. Indeed–and you can search for yourself–there is an overwhelming number of commentators who argue the opposite and they conclude that the pursuit of fame is not worth it in the end. Fame
So, I have to ask. If it is not worth it then why bother but isn’t this the same question that I asked when we started exploring this topic? If so, then we have come–literally–full circle. We are right back where we started. My observation is that usually situations in life that take us in a circle and drop us of right where we started are not the best for us. In fact, they more often than not represent a waste of time or a lack of clear direction.
Am I saying that fame is no good then? No. Quite the opposite. Fame, as a natural byproduct of success or uniqueness, can be quire rewarding and a great experience and indeed representative of your level of accomplishment or notoriety otherwise you would not be famous. However, when fame is simply sought for the sake of fame it’s a dangerous plan. Think of it like love. If you wanted to fall in love that is the natural consequence that happens when you meet someone who you have feelings for. There is no timetable for love or a guaranteed method to create it. You simply have to let it happen. DisillusionedNow consider someone who wants to fall in love–now. No doubt you can overlook “stop” signs and ignore issues and that will help you reach love very quickly albeit it may not be what you really need or indeed really want deep down. But what good is that? What good is it to say that you found love when in fact you forced it; it didn’t happen naturally. Your joy may not be real even though it is what you “wanted’ at the time. Additionally, forced love is more than likely fleeting and don’t we all know someone who fooled themselves into thinking that they were in love when they really were not?
“Honesty is the true compass of life; it tells us where we really are at. Desire, on the other hand, is a deceptive form of radar; it fools us into thinking we are headed in the right direction when in fact we are lost.”
Instead, love–like fame–is a process that I would suggest should be allowed to follow its own course. If it happens, it happens. If not, then it wasn’t meant to be. In my opinion, it should never be forced. Honesty is the true compass of life; it tells us where we really are at. Desire, on the other hand, is a deceptive from of radar; it fools us into thinking we are headed in the right direction when in fact we are lost. And I can add an ironic anecdote? I think once you understand that you might be chasing a cloud you will have a better understanding of yourself and you will avoid pursuing or wanting things you really don’t need or in the end will really want. That understanding might not bring you fame in our big old world but in your own private universe, it will make you an allstar of epic proportion and that’s quite an achievement.
Ken “K Bo” Biedzynski, Editor

 

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